Browsing: English Versions

Showing posts with label English Versions.

To say great things about Nina Simone is so cliché that it’s not even worth the trouble. Nina was amazing. In 1992, she moved to the south of France where she stayed until her death, in 2003. It is obvious in her work that she really loved both the music and the country. In 1965, she released an album that featured three French songs: Ne me quitte pas, by Jacques Brel, Tomorrow is my turn, an amazing version of L’amour c’est comme un jour and You’ve got to learn, both by Charles Aznavour. In 1987, her greatest hit My baby…

For some reason (no idea why), the French national anthem, the famous Marseillaise made an appearance on Twitter’s trending topics today in France. The subject reminded me of the great version by Serge Gainsbourg, a version that goes against all the bullshit of war and all the blood that drips out from this amazing song, leaving behind only the beauty of the melody. And, since the subject is La Marseillaise being transformed and reinterpreted by pop icons, here’s another very famous version of the song.

Gilbert Bécaud was and incredibly important figure in the history of French chanson. His nickname Monsieur 100 000 volts was due to his electric presence on stage – specially in his favorite venue: the Olympia, in Paris – the singer remained popular for 50 years and was responsible for great immortal songs that were know worldwide. Bécaud had some of his songs translated into English and was recorded by people from the first rank, like t Frank Sinatra, Nina Simone, Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Elvis Presley, Neil Diamond, Sonny and Cher, and James Brown. Not bad, right? His most famous…

Yesterday, Le Figaro published an article on the new generation of French singers pointing out the fact that, in 2011, the girls outshone the boys when it comes to French chanson. I couldn’t agree more. Out of all my favorite French male singers, only Thomas Dutronc released a new record this year and I wouldn’t call it exactly to-die-for. Vincent Delerm is in the business of making children’s music; Bénabar is not really getting me excited about his new album; Bensé doesn’t even updates the News section of his website since January 2010 and Dominique A has just announced he’s…

Jules Dassin was an American movie director and one of those artists that were forced to leave the U.S. because he was listed on the horrible Hollywood Blacklist created in the 50’s. In 1960, he wrote and directed the movie “Never on Sunday” and the theme song of the movie, originally sang in Greek, became a great hit worldwide after winning an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1960. After that, the song was covered in English (by great girls like Petula Clark and The Chordettes), Italian, Spanish, Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian, German, Dutch and even Mandarin. The French version…

Very often people ask me why I chose this name for the blog and the reason is very simple: it’s the name of a classic French song. The original song is called “Sous le ciel the Paris” (which translates precisely as “Under Paris Skies) and was recorded by a lot of great people, like Édith Piaf and Yves Montand. Here are some of my favorite versions of it: